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20130801
20130831
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
. there are all kinds of safeguards built into this. i remember george bush, when he talked about this program, when it was first revealed by the new york times. he said, when al qaeda calls somebody in the united states, i want to know who they are calling. that is kind of the underlying philosophy of this program. talking again -- it always intends to spill over into people thinking, maybe we are monitoring the actual content of their conversations, is we are not all stop this metadata. it is effectively the outside of the envelope that is put in your mailbox. it is that information that is on the envelope. and the date stamp in the postage stamp. would you have people believe that metadata has no significant privacy interest? i would rather, if i had a choice -- i hope not to have either of these choices -- of having every phone conversation i have for 30 days listens to, which is impractical, to have a large number of people doing all my metadata collected for 30 days. i would much rather. >> if it was collected by proctor and gamble or colgate, i would be worried. sometimes, we do not thi
in the "new york times" in 2005. george bush partially declassified it. i learned, for the first time, to my extreme dismay, that in the first 3.5 years of this program, the president had used his article to authority to run the program, rather than the provisions of law, fica, which congress enacted in 1978, the foreign intelligence surveillance act was passed in 1978 in response to the abuses of the nixon administration and the recommendation of the church commission. it set up a careful system of a fisa court, an intelligence committee on the hill was set up then to monitor these applications. it worked very well, in my view, through 2001. congress after that pulled it back. i believe strongly that may the amount of metadata is excessive. i am sure my buddy thinks this. that ought to be debated. maybe the program should be narrowed. there has been robust oversight over the years. >> i want to be clear on this. who can accesses data and for what purposes? >> i think this was in a letter that went to the hill yesterday. papers were sent to congress in 2009. i cannot speak to any individual
dick cheney, george bush, waterboarding, the fbi and others, and the nsa has been unscathed. the only time it has really come up as a matter of debate in the intelligence community was people from the nsa humming forward and saying what a rough time they were having with the fisa court, how hard it was for them to get orders, how hard it was for them to follow up on the information. this is not a rubber stamp. it is constantly scrutinized. it is scrutinized by the house intelligence committee and senate intelligence committee. i realize by going to the american people and saying, congress is taking a look at it, that is not a vote of confidence. people on that committee, and people on the intelligence they take very seriously. mike rogers is conscientious. dutch ruppersberger is as well. the stuff is looked at very carefully. i do not see any significant violation of civil liberties. i do not see any significant -- -- in 2009, balance i, i was at mayor bloomberg's home sunday night in september of 2009, entertained the lord , rupert murdoch was there, all these partial people, and eve
of texas does recently because of the leadership though shown by george w. bush, is that when you look at states like arizona, not typical in arizona, but i was just thinking alabama, arkansas' next. if you look at arizona, if memory serves arizona export something like $50 billion a year. if you look at texas can we export $206 billion a year. 35% of those exports go directly to mexico. i think george w. bush understood the tenuous but important relationship that has to exist with our neighbors to the south. i think he was very strategic and smart in building and growing and fostering a relationship over time. and today, texas is benefiting from his leadership back then. a large proportion of the hispanic owned firms in this state and minority owned firms in the state are actually owned by mexican nationals. and so this didn't happen by accident. it happened because very strategic visionary leadership happened two, three decades or a decade ago. now we are benefiting from the. >> creating an environment. >> absolutely. doesn't happen overnight. now you see other states beginning to re
for former president george w. bush after he underwent heart surgery. in an e-mail to supporters, the nrcc writes that the procedure went according to plan and bush is in good spirits. president george w. bush courageously defended our freedom and our country, and we are missing his days in office now more than ever. the mail also contains a link byking supporters to chip in donating money to help us send president bush a bouquet of bluebonnets, the texas state flower. also, this message from the kremlin. russian president vladimir putin today is wishing george w. bush a speedy recovery. speaking of former president, from a member of the washington post the fix -- it was 39 years ago today that richard nixon announced he would resign. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. suburb some sort of anti- person who thinks everybody needs to live in new york city. comingensitive to be across as a condo-dwelling elitist of some kind. that is not why i did this book. i understand why people like the suburbs. i get fed up with a lot of daily life in new york city. undeniablewere so
on immigration. here is a preview of the event hosted last month at the george w. bush institute last month. these are just rough numbers, about a million new jobs in the state of texas in the last five years. roughly a million lost jobs in california. that is amazing. points is what we are seeing right now is one of the great wealth transfers in american history geographically from states like california that don't get it right, my home state of illinois that don't get it right and states that do get it right like texas. this is one reason to be bullish on the future of texas. the interesting thing is texas and california are the two highest immigration states. the tax system is a much better job of economically assimilating immigrants so they are successful here. tell a foreign more of a welfare invites immigrants and the welfare system at a much higher pace than texas does. people come to texas, in my opinion, for jobs. people come to california for welfare grade i think you see the differing economic outcomes as a result. texas is the model other states should be emulating. see that ent
for. george w. bush had done that i think he would've been, we would've been heard cries of impeachment. we had part of our immigration laws suspended by the president. there's just a variety of issues like that where he has gone outside. we have tension with our system, struggles between congress and the president. this one is very -- i think you'll see it continue. but there will be legal cases. >> i'm going to try to bounce around a little bit but again we will get to everybody. >> i was a little concerned to find that you were not in support of making the continuing resolution contingent upon removing what optional spending you move on obamacare. i feel very strongly. i speak from a point of view -- [applause] >> i think they do, too. >> this is not theoretical for me because two weeks ago today my husband and i paid in cash for our son to have major surgery. but, you know, what? that's the price i paid for the liberty of my children. i'm self-employed. i understand the consequent of that as i've limited options thanks our government on insurance. i understand that i
friends. .hey were pretty frustrated they did not like george bush very much. they sure hated losing to him in 2004, even more than 2000. they did not quit. they took the house and the senate in 2006. they never try to impeach george bush. think long and hard. always easier to say try it. usually that means we need to work harder at what we are doing. i am old enough to watch barry goldwater go down in flames. took 16 years to get one old reagan -- to get ronald reagan. democracy is hard work. it is people going out and knocking on doors. is is people going out and voting. .ur system works it is hard to work in part because that is what the founders wanted to be. they are afraid of centralized power. they're going to make this very difficult to do. they're going to have this president for four years that selected this. there's no other system that is is as complex as ours to work and get things through. the founders but it was the best defense for liberty. out.large it has worked i believe that madison came back he would be very happy. sometimes they do. different point of view are s
of the office of legal counsel in the justice department during the george w. bush administration. welcome to both of you. >> thank you. >> james bamford, we heard earlier this gwen's discussion about new revelations what, do you think of those and what do they tell us about this role of the fisa court? >> these new revelations are really an expansive look at a much more expansive eavesdropping capability. we looked before at the telephone and the e-mail. now, this is pretty much the internet. and it's very worrisome in the sense that people when they communicate on the internet are communicating basically their thoughts, their deepest thoughts in their minds a lot of times. their thoughts sometimes that they don't want to share with anybody else. if you have this megacollection that's going oagain, it raises will the question of what oversight is there and what checks and balances are there? we didn't see there were very many checks and balances on the other systems. and maybe the same thing applies here. >> brown: we'll walk through some of those issues, but first, generally, what's your
bush, and george w. bush. they say that, quote, there is no longer any credible scientific debate, end quote, about climate change. and they also point out that our window for action is shrinking. they say they support the actions that the president is now taking under the clean air act to reduce carbon pollution, and they call on congress to start the overdue debate about what bigger steps are needed domestically and internationally. and they conclude with this very powerful statement. quote, the only uncertainty about our world is how bad these changes will get and how soon what is most clear is that there is no time to waste, end quote. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. for what purpose does the gentleman from arizona rise? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> mr. speaker, i rise today to address attorney general holder's misinterpretation of federalism and his disregard for our system of checks and balances. the supreme court was clear in shelby vs. hold
hardly ever come up. they were attacking dick cheney, attacking george bush with, attacking the fbi and others, nsa had pretty much been unscathed in all this. the only time it really came up as a matter of debate in the intelligence committee was people from the nsa coming forward and saying what a rough time they were having with the fisa court, how hard it was for them to get court orders, how hard it was to be able to follow up on the information they were getting. this is not a rubber stamp. this is constantly scrutinized. it's also scrutinized by the house and senate intelligence committees. i worry saying congress is keeping an eye on it for you isn't exactly a vote of confidence. but, seriously, people on the intelligence committee take it very seriously. i can tell you that this stuff is looked at very, very carefully. so i think we have to keep all of this in mind. i don't see any significant violation of civil liberties. i don't see any significant -- to me, if we have a balanced thought like with zazi in 2009, zazi, and this is one of those forest gump moments where you
that both in terms of his experience here at the george george bush institute but more partly in terms of his experience as an army officer. >> thank you robert payday would like to start out by wishing congratulations to our newest citizens. my experience over the past 24 years as active military service has been in our our most engage service-oriented and patriotic citizens and servicemembers are our newest. and so as the director of the military service initiatives here i had the honor and responsibility to lead the bush institute's effort to honor the service and sacrifice of all of their post-9/11 veterans military servicemembers and their families but also to empower and unite the efforts of non-profits businesses universities individual citizens and communities to improve the well-being of those veteran servicemembers and their families but also to release their potential to continue to serve as national assets in their communities after their military service is over. and so since september 11, 2001, 2.3 million members of this country have gone -- worn the uniform in iraq or a
george bush when he talked about this program when it was first revealed by "the new york times." he said, well, when al qaeda and call somebody in the united states, i want to know who they're calling. that's kind of the underlying philosophy of this program, and i think it's the purpose. we're talking, it tends to spill over into people thinking, well, maybe we are monitoring their actual content of the conversation and we're not. it's medicaid, records, effectively the outside of the envelope that is put in your mailbox. it's that information that is on the envelope. and the date stamp and the postmark. >> would you have people believe that metadata have no significant privacies? i would rather if i had a choice, i hope not have either of these choices, of having every phone conversation i have for 30 days listening to them which, of course, is impractical to have a large number of people doing that, or all my metadata collected for 30 days? i would much rather -- >> collected by proctor and gamble oracle victoria beckham corporation, then i would be worried. and i think sometimes we d
capacities when george w. bush was governor of texas. we are really delighted that wen has developed such visuals to help understand the complicated story of finding what did not work so well and how we can do better the next time. we have invited him to make his presentation first. jim has recently finished up his tour at the pentagon. career he was a research research scholar at the national defense university rector of research there. he worked throughout his career on the questions a stabilization and reconstruction including at the un and other success stories in cambodia amid the balkans, and elsewhere. he will speak on his own reflections of what will be the right tools and mechanisms to respond and post-conflict environments. we are very delighted to have leanne smith, the director of the policy and risk best practices services. she has been in that position for years. she has a long career as an australian diplomat and a person who has worked on humanitarian law. we do really want to bring in how does the broader international community handle these questions. they are the c
as even can for this president. though this program started under george bush. i do not think edward snowden would have had the courage to come out with something like this during that administration because we would not even know where he was right now if he was anywhere. guest: i am sympathetic. i think many in his theynistration know better. know there is a first amendment that whistleblowers need to be protected. he campaigned to get national security whistle-blowers and intelligence whistle-blowers equal rights to other federal employees. i was at that meeting where his administration backed off the promise is very early on. capitulated to the same special interests. it has been that way for all the residents.bush, everybody has gone along with the exception of intelligence. it is disappointing, extremely disappointing, but that is the nature of our political system right now.it's up to the american people to voice their concerns. demand all federal employees need the safe, effective channels to voice concerns and will lead to a full review of their concerns. we need to push for
's an attorney. he worked in several capacities when george w. bush was the founder of texas. the halon affiliation and they were delighted that stuart bowen has developed such innovative and attractive materials to understand. i think it really is held that there's a lot of visual presentation of lessons and iraq and the very complicated story of funding what didn't work very well. and how we can do betterh next te. we have invited stuart bowen to meet his presentations first. we will then turn to jim schear, who has recently finished his second tour of the pentagon as an assistant secretary for responsibility for stability operations in his earlier career he was a research scholar at the national defense university, director of research there and worked throughout his career on these questions of stabilization and reconstruction including at the u.n. and some of its early post of war success stories in cambodia, the balkans and elsewhere. so how did stuart bowen ideas, what kind of responses were there more broadly in the pentagon and the interagency community and his own reflections
criticizing the administration's -- we cut the budget and increased the overseas activities. george w. bush didn't run for president carried back to the 2008 campaign literature he didn't run promising a defense buildup and he wasn't intending to make foreign policy the center of his foreign policy than he wound up making as we know one of the most hardest decisions in history about the war of choice in iraq. so i don't think that cutting our military is going to be the best way to keep us out of trouble in the south china sea. i want steadiness and results and sustain the balance. that means we can make the economies and defense but not cuts like sequestration. >> mackenzie, you're concluding thoughts? >> i think that was very good. there isn't much to add except i wouldn't put all my eggs in one basket is basically the summary. all i want peace through strength or a modern day version of it, because i want a military that the tours. talking on the military front i want all those other things, too. i want strong allies, i want our partners capacity to be robust enough to defend themselves
passed fewer executive orders at this point in his presidenciy than did george w. bush or bill clinton. people are always annoyed when presidents act with executive orders. aren't they? but presidents do it. it is their prerogative. and that's what his predecessors did even more than he did. >> it's not the number. >> you did when you were president. >> did i executive orders when i was governor. i never bypassed the law. i didn't do things that i knew i could not do under the constitution of my state. what i think is different is not how many it's what they do. executive order that says we are going to order federal employees to, you know, to work through their lunch hour for six months. okay, that's not a constitutional issue. a federal executive order where the president says we're going to let people come into the country even though though don't have documentation and even though the law doesn't permit it, that's a violation. >> alisyn: the dream act doesn't say that what he did with the dream act kids brought here through no fault of their own. >> i agree with the dream act's goa
of defense in the george h w bush administration. who morrow is at the end covers the court for the national law journal and prior to that, he was a reporter for " legal times" and" usa today." i want to introduce terry to wner in the middle of all these reporters. she is here because she is an academic from oakland university who studies to things that are quite relevant to this particular panel. one is the supreme court and the press and the other is the role of new media. we will start with professor towner and after she finishes her presentation, we will go tonythe line from tom on and then we will open it up for questions. oakland university located in rochester, michigan. i specialize in american politics and media and politics and this is one of the reasons i am here. onresearch tends to focus the role of social media and campaigns and elections with the specific focus on the task to presidential elections, dubbed as they web 2.0 elections. examined how journalists and reporters frame media coverage of the court particularly regarding affirmative action cases. recently, the cont
on the others i think it's a war. medal was approved by congress, not a dime ever voted for it. had george w. bush had done that i think we would have heard cries of impeachment. we are part of our immigration laws, and i was suspended by the president when the year before he said he couldn't do that. there's just a variety of issues like that when he's gone outside. we have to tension with our system, struggles between congress and the president, but this one is very cities. you will see it continue. but there will be legal cases. all the way back. i'm going to try to bounce around all of it. it begin, we will get to everybody. >> i was a little concerned to find that you are not in support of making the continuing resolution contingent upon removing what optional spending you can remove on obamacare. i feel very strongly. i think the other speaker i speak from my point of view -- applaud not this is not theoretical because two weeks ago today my husband and i paid in cash for our son to have major surgery. a four-hour procedure. that's the price i pay for the liberty of my children. i'm se
the george w. bush administration and was part of the council of economic advisers. specimen so much for being here today. special thanks to mohammed el- erian and mr. taylor for flying from california. i went to kick off the panel with you. coined the term, the new normal in 2009. your outlook for the economy has been dead on. how much longer is this economy going to remain in the new normal? me take you back to 2009 when the new normal concept came out. the idea was to signal that it would not be your traditional cyclical recovery. unless the mindset in washington changed, and there was a better understanding of the underlying dynamics, we risked getting stuck. in a keyword of unusually sluggish clerk -- growth, high on implement, that is when it materialized. concept of the economy stuck in second gear. let me push this analogy. it is not just stuck in second gear, it is being driven on a foggy road. there is some good news. we are doing better than others. europe was in reverse and just went to neutral. japan has been neutral for a long time and just jumps to first gear. we are d
for and what you were responsible for. >> guest: i served under but george w. bush administration and was appointed by the transportation secretary norman. and as you may know, he is a democrat who served in the republican administration and he was responsible for offering and then congress passed a reorganization act that led to the creation of this agency. and this agency fmsa receives a million daily shipments of hazardous air, land, truck, and sea, dessel and pipeline. >> host: you're current work with the national transportation advisers, what is that? >> guest: i am a lawyer by training and we also have a consulting practice. so, we talk infrastructure projects, transportation projects to both public and private sector clients. >> host: is one of your clients keystone xl? is anybody supporting trans canada? >> guest: no, sir. >> host: as far as keystone xl is concerned, the decision that you were taking, where do you stand if it shouldn't be built on the extension we've been talking about? >> guest: i've been monitoring this for several years. when i was at the d.o.t. the or
, and that is former president george h.w. bush. i've had, i had a chance to work with him, incredible leader, an incredible human being who has given so much back to the community. as president of the united states, but as former president of the united states. so i am honored to stand in for him today. he apologizes, but -- [laughter] we've been talking a lot about work force and whether we have the right people in lace to provide the services -- in place to provide the services. you're the front line. you're the absolute front line. and for people to be able to get quality, affordable health care, they have to be able to come through that door and be accepted and have confidence that they're going to be treated with the care that they expect. and you have provided that. and you have done that as a volunteer. which is just remarkable from the point of view of if we could clone you and have you throughout -- [laughter] it would make life a lot easier. we've talked a lot also about how do you get people into the system, and you personally have gotten people into the system because of the mann
just a if uh -- just a few years ago in the bush administration, we didn't give the united nations inspection team on the ground enough time. george tennett, the cia chief at the time, walked into the oval office just before the invasion and said, mr. president, it's a slam dunk. there are weapons of mass destruction in iraq. while we know how that played out. so i think that it's very important that we allow the u.n. inspectors on the ground to do a thorough investigation. but frankly, gentlemen, i'm fearful that the iraq scene could reemerge as we know about one month or six weeks ago. president obama was quoted as saying, yes, they've used -- yes, the government of syria has used chemical weapons and i have proof of that. however, the president never indicated what his proof was. and that one tended to die. so, gentlemen, i'm fearful that the -- that the -- the warships that are now moving in closer to syria may -- may use their missiles to take out government airfields and government installations without waiting for the u.n. team to -- to do their full investigation which may
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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